RCDs with a minimum residual current of 30 mA are required for circuits rated 32 Amps or less that are supplying socket-outlets, lighting, direct-connected handheld equipment, and direct-connected equipment that presents increased risk of electrical shock. RCD requirements become applicable when switchboards are altered or replaced. In an alteration, RCDs are required for all circuits. Where all circuits would be fitted with RCDs following a switchboard replacement, this can quite often cause...
14
Sep

Posted by on September 14th, 2020 •  0 Comments  • 

RCDs are a mandatory safety device designed to minimise the risk of an electric shock from electrical circuits and equipment, therefore it is the responsibility of building owners or managing agents to ensure that RCDs are tested. Tenants must be informed of the requirements, and document that they’ve done so, to protect themselves from liability. If a tenant will not permit RCD testing at the required testing interval, the managing agent or building owner could become liable. When an in...
The Victorian Energy Upgrades (VEU) Program, implemented by the Victorian Government continues to achieve great results for Property Owners. The program was implemented by the Victorian Government in order to: contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases make energy efficiency improvements more affordable encourage investment, employment and innovation in industries that supply energy efficiency goods and services Under the program, Facility Managers have had access to apply...
What are the current regulations for RCDs? In Australia, all commercial businesses and industrial facilities are required to maintain electrical safety, to remain compliant. One important component of electrical safety is the periodic testing of RCDs, to ensure they work correctly. RCD testing requirements are in place to help the owner or managing agent maintain safety and compliance, these requirements are outlined is AS/NZS 3760, AS/NZS 3000 and AS/NZS 3017. AS/NZS 3017 sets out common...
Standards Australia and Standards New Zealand have issued Standard AS/NZ 2293.1: 2018 (effective 29th June 2018) for Emergency Lighting in Buildings, superseding AS 2293.1: 2005. The Standard series covers three parts: Part 1: Design, installation and operation Part 2: Inspection and maintenance Part 3: Emergency luminaires and exit signs The objective of the AS/NZS 2293 series of Standards is to detail requirements and provide guidelines to ensure all exit and emergency lightin...
04
Aug

Posted by on August 4th, 2020 •  0 Comments  • 

Case Study: Power Factor Correction Summary Commercial Office Building: 9,243m2 Location: 187 Todd Road, Port Melbourne VIC Project Value: $30k Return on Investment: 6-7 months Project Summary: Installation of 300kVAR Power Factor Correction Unit to manage their peak kVA demand, improve electrical efficiency and drive down overall electricity costs. Opportunity The asset is a three story commercial office building with a net lettable area of 9,243m2. As with many commercial...
Case Study: C-Bus Lighting Centralisation Summary Client: Dexus Location: 360 Collins St, Melbourne VIC Project Summary: Provide a centralised C-Bus lighting system for all common areas from Level 1 to Level 35 to be controlled and programmed remotely. Opportunity­­­­ 360 Collins Street is one of Melbourne’s most prestigious buildings, offering 35 levels of prime office space. Prolux are the electrical maintenance contractors for the A-grade building and have identified th...